Sunday, May 24, 2015

Fix, Foot, Food


The Fix
On Monday, I took the Good Deal Bus out of the stable for a 30-mile trek to meet my friend, Debra, for lunch.  Within a 20-minute period, I experienced 3 mishaps.  I scraped the ground effects on a severely inclined roadway entrance.  

Web Photo showing the location of the contact.

Imagine the sound of the iceberg ripping the Titanic open along its steel hull  Fortunately, the only damage was cosmetic and not a mangled battery compartment as I had feared.   

Next this warning light came on.  



I had done my usual pre-flight check before leaving home and the tire pressures were good.  Now the read-out on the left rear tire is not operational.  It took me a minute to figure out it was an instrumentation problem and not a blow-out waiting to happen.

Then I got lost. 

An eventful 20-minutes, but still waaay better than a good Monday at the office!

After lunch I found a nearby Chevy dealer that got the poor GDB right into the exam room.  



The diagnosis: the tire sensor battery was dead.  The dealer had a replacement in stock and an hour and $157 later, the GDB was rolling again.  With a passenger car, I wouldn’t have bothered replacing the sensor but the GDB weighs 9,000 pounds so tire pressure is much more critical. 

The Foot



I woke up one morning last week and couldn’t walk due to intense pain with weight-bearing in the ball of the right foot.  It feels like trodding barefoot over rocks. Ouch.  Right there.  



A visit to a specialist revealed a diagnosis of a neuroma – an benign enlargement of the nerve, something that occurs with age.  Unfortunately, it’s a chronic condition but can be alleviated by cushions and anesthetic cream.  Does anyone else have this? Any advice? 

My biggest fear is that my ability to hike may be affected. The MD reassured me that with the right cushioning and a little luck, hiking shouldn’t be a problem. I haven’t tried walking in my hiking boots yet, but am choosing to be optimistic that I can still scale some mountains this summer.

The Food

We are continuing with our string of new recipe successes! John found this one for Ribs with BlackVinegar Sauce. 



Oh my. 



The ribs turned out sticky and luscious – similar to what you hope for with Korean BBQ.  I developed a special love for Korean BBQ in NYC – a love that remained unrequited, until now. 

I knew we were meant to be together!






  

16 comments:

  1. My napkin is tucked neatly under my chin, and I have another on my lap - so pass over dem ribs, Gurl!

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

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    1. You'll need a BIG napkin. A rain poncho might be a better choice.

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  2. Jim had the same problem with one of his feet. Shoes with a wider toe box made all the difference.

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    1. Thanks! I've read that usually helps. Tell Jim I look forward to discussing our feet issues during our next Happy Hour.

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  3. Wht day I have been following your blog for some time but I don't think I have commented on it.....but when I seen that you had a neuroma I had one on my foot in the 1970's...the doctor operated on it and I ended up with several toes and part ofthe bottom of my foot with no feeling it was a permanent condition andI swore would never have surgery on my feet again I hope yours works with the alternative and you don't have to have surgery....anyway I love your blog even when you're not traveling...donna

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    1. Grammy - thanks so much for sharing your experience. The MD said that surgery may be an option but also cautioned about the loss of feeling. I'll do anything to avoid surgery though. Thanks again!

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  4. Three! Count them, three foot surgeries for neuromas. The most important first step is the metatarsal pad in a full length orthotic. The goal is to separate the metatarsal heads so they quit rubbing and enlarging the bursa that is forming in your metatarsal space. As a rule, they do not get better. It's very difficult to get the pad placed perfectly, generally I had the podiatrist not glue the layers of the orthotic so I can move the pad. There are many you tubes on this. Basically, mark on your foot where it hurts and put the pad BEHIND it. You can also buy pads and use Superfeet to MacGyver an orthotic. Don't let this go, it'll get worse. Surgery, if required, is effective (when done correctly) but your foot will never feel the same. My right foot has lost two fat pads, the left foot just feels odd and often stings, but doesn't hurt. Go forth, get thee a metatarsal pad!

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    1. Thanks Allison for sharing. I've got the pads on order. Bummer that this may be chronic.

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  5. So sorry for your foot pain. I have neuropathy in my feet which causes pain and tingling in my feet. Certainly not the same thing as you are experiencing but my Keen hiking boots are some of my best shoes to wear because they have a wide forefoot and toe area. One other thing that helps me is to use cooling gel packs that I keep in the refrigerator after walking or hiking. It seems to help with the inflammation and cool my feet down. I don't freeze it but like the cooling effect. I hope you find something that works for you!! Getting older is NOT for SISSIES!

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    1. Thanks Karen! It's funny the metatarsal space doesn't hurt when I wear my Keen-like sandals or my beloved Crocs. It's the barefoot walking about that is so painful. The gel packs sound like a great idea.

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  6. I can tell you the saga of my foot. I had a similar complaint about 1 year ago. I bought new professionally fitted running shoes, which did help but did not cure. I had a pair of very rigid walking shoes, Rockport, that made it possible to place weight on that foot. I gave away all of my sandals and bought shoes with a wide toe box. So, &1 year later my foot problem seems to be a thing of the past; however, I am very particular about my shoes now. They must have some
    Cushion and the must fit($$$).

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    1. Thanks Phyllis - maybe this is something that will pass. The MD wouldn't predict.

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  7. I should not read your blog when I am hungry!

    Well good luck with the foot. I have no advice, just good wishes!

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  8. I too have this problem. It just suddenly comes on for what seems like no apparent reason and it feels as if I have severly bruised the bottom of my foot. Sometimes just a change of footware and a little rest does the trick. As I get older these little niggles in the joints appear and often just a change of routine and a rest from activities is all thats required. After a trip to the doctor with knee problems his diagnosis was just carry on doing things but manage it.

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  9. Hi Kim, long time reader, first time commenter here. I love your blog -- I think it's my favorite RVer blog!

    I'll chime in regarding your neuroma. I had one between my 3rd and 4th toes that flared up periodically for several years. There are lots of treatment options ... pads, orthotics, cortisone and alcohol injections, and finally surgery. I went through all of them over the years, and finally had surgery. My recommendation is to do the same. Try all the other options first. They may help and will certainly buy you some time. But in the end, IF you must have surgery, it's not the end of the world. Mine was very successful. Yes, I have a numb sensation on two toes, but when I'm wearing shoes, I don't notice it at all. Barefoot, it's a little more noticeable, but it's not a bad feeling. It's 200% better than the pain! I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

    Good luck to you!
    Donna

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  10. DH gets this in spades when he is taking the cancer drug, Revlimid. He is at the end of his second month in this round, and the neuromas have just popped out. On other occasions, it has occurred earlier on in the cycle, so maybe his body is handling the "poison" better now. I routinely massage his feet and legs twice a day to ward off neuropathy, and this seems to help with the neuromas (3) as well.

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

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Let's chat !